Queues before buying are not a hell of a wait for all consumers

One of the things that consumers hate in stores, or that is what all the studies on how to animate the Christmas campaign were pointing out, is having to queue to get a product or to have their gift packaged. But the truth is that queuing is not always hated and it is not always frowned upon by customers. There are queues and queues and some are quite charming: the consumer is willing to stand up, to have to join a long line and to see it with very good eyes. It’s the charm of the ranks Georgia Mobile Database at least the ones that are seen as the path to a final reward. Queues can therefore be a powerful marketing tool to convey to general consumers that you are expecting something exceptional in the end. How can you keep consumers happy while they wait? As pointed out from an article in Inc, the secret lies in, on the one hand, keeping the waiting consumers entertained (which is what makes stores put things on the checkout lines, such as products to make the shopper pick and buy or televisions that entertain the wait) and, on the other, in knowing that buyers want to be there (it is not the same to wait with boredom at the supermarket to pay for two cartons of milk and a bottle of shampoo than to queue in front of store X to get that tablet last generation).

But although brands can make certain movements to make queues more attractive, the truth is that consumer perception also greatly influences how having to queue looks like. According to a study by the University of Chicago, consumers are happy waiting in line and joining those endless lines. They are not in any case, certainly, but they are in certain specifics that help some products. Consumers wait happily if they think the wait is worth it. In that case, being in line waiting is already a source of excitement and enthusiasm, it is part of the shopping experience. The queues become a kind of social blessing, a kind of agreement between buyers, which consolidates the image of the product and confirms that it is something worth sacrificing time for. The final step will be a great reward. It’s what makes consumers wait their turn at restaurants or New Yorkers queue up very early to grab one of the limited cronuts sold by Dominique Ansel.

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And it is, without a doubt, the reason why they are willing to endure a snowfall on the street (it happened in Japan not long ago) to get the latest from Apple. Apple, the genius of the ranks And it is that Apple is the great example of the power of convocation of the queues and the interest that consumers have in waiting if what is at the end they believe will be a reward. Brother Cell Phone List The company is also one of those that has best known how to turn queues into an element of communication. As pointed out in this article from Business Insider , Steve Jobs loved to see queues at the doors of their tents when launching new products because it confirmed the interest of consumers for their product but also because it was a powerful (and inexpensive) way to promotion of the same.

In some of its latest products, the queues even started 15 days before it was even known what was going to be sold (Apple indicates a date to announce something and they account for that something will be 15 days later in stores: the day of the announcement and before it they are installed in the store). Not all were fans of the brand, there were also those who saw in this solution a way of doing business (the first of the line in New York with the iPhone 6 were, in fact, paid by an electronics resale store that had them there as a communication effort). But although each one has their intentions, the truth is that Apple plays with those queues and enhances them in order to achieve that the visual impact of the queues is greater and the consumer is even more convinced that its products are powerful objects of desire. With the launch of the second version of the iPad, they did not allow pre-reservations of the product, so the only way to be the first to have it was to be the first to enter the store. Bottom line: Apple made the queues for the iPad 2 vastly outnumber the original iPad.

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